Pete Davidson faces flak for making fans sign USD 1 million Non Disclosure Agreement before comedy shows

According to reports, if you want to watch Pete Davidson perform live, you may have to be willing to sign a $1 million nondisclosure agreement (NDA).
Pete Davidson,HollywoodPete Davidson faces flak for making fans sign USD 1 million Non Disclosure Agreement before comedy shows.
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Imagine going for a stand-up comedy show and your phones being seized away. Or worse even, not being allowed to voice your opinion on it. Well, comedian and actor Pete Davidson may have just done that. According to reports, if you want to watch Pete Davidson perform live, you may have to be willing to sign a $1 million nondisclosure agreement (NDA). Yes, you heard that right. The NDA surfaced when a girl named Stacy Young shared it on social media and revealed that she was asked to sign the NDA on the day of the show. 

Over the weekend, like Stacy, audience members were asked to sign an NDA before Pete's show at the Sydney Goldstein Theater in San Francisco on November 27. However, Stacy refused to sign the agreement and spoke what exactly was wrong with it. But first, let's see what the NDA entails. The NDA reads, "by signing this agreement, you are agreeing not to discuss any details of the show you are about to watch or your experiences at this event." It added that blog posts or social media posts about the show were not allowed. Any breach of contract would “require payment of $1 million in damages” as well as any resulting legal feeds, People reports.

Apart from that, audiences were also asked to hand over their phones and provide contact information as well as the social media user names. Stacy Young revealed that she did not sign the NDA and was given a full refund on the spot. In her post, she wrote, "I understood and was willing to consent to the initial request of locking up any phones or cameras brought to the event, but I think this a bit ridiculous and over the top. I get that comedians are protective of their jokes and don’t want their routines rebroadcast, but it’s rather Orwellian to not allow anyone to share an opinion on it. Don’t perform for the public if you don’t want people to have an opinion about it!"

She also added, "I didn’t want to sign it because it was basically saying that I wasn’t able to comment on it or have an opinion. The most you could say is ‘no comment.’" 

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