Alludu Adhurs Movie Review: A bungling comedy that is immensely avoidable

Alludu Adhurs Movie Review: If you are pining for a comedy this season, you better watch some old-fashioned fun entertainers on the Internet.
Alludu Adhurs Movie Review: A bungling comedy that is immensely avoidable.
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Movie Name: Alludu Adhurs

Cast: Bellamkonda Sai Sreenivas, Nabha Natesh, Anu Emmanuel, Prakash Raj, Sonu Sood and others

Director: Santosh Srinivas 

Rating: 1.5

Telugu filmmakers have this itch for establishing the quirks of lead characters by setting up the story right from their childhood. In 'Alludu Adhurs', which is the loudest Sankranti release, Seenu is shown as a child who starts hating women after his first love walks out of his life without batting an eyelid. Soon after, the hero enters the screen amid a heavy background score and picks up a quarrel with totally unknown characters because his friend is being chased by goons. This is your typical masala comedy trope. 

The trouble starts soon after this cliched prologue. The hero walks up to Jaipal Reddy (Prakash Raj), a powerful man who will amputate anyone who has feelings for his daughter Kaumudhi (Nabha Natesh), and announces that he loves her. After provoking Reddy, he stages an escape from the mansion and lands in the office of the City Commissioner, who is the biggest clown among all the characters introduced thus far. Reddy is made to agree to an insane proposal and the hero's utterly frivolous ways take wings from this point, taking a break only a full one-hundred-and-thirty minutes later.

From the trailer, it was more than clear that 'Alludu Adhurs' is a mindless entertainer. We were invited to sign up for the genre. Fine, but then what is on display in the film is a factory of inanities in a universe of a hyperlink-level confusing screenplay. 

After a point, we struggle to fathom who is joking and who is not, who is genuinely clownish and which character will retain their senses till the next scene. If you don't dig into the incredulous universe of the illogical characters that populate the film, you will fail to comprehend who is whose friend, who is whose enemy, what will be their reaction to a given situation, so on and so forth. There are two sisters whose feelings get drowned out in the cacophony.

Prakash Raj and Sonu Sood play consequential characters, but even their presence is irritating when it's not plain boring. The former strains himself to look funny. Nabha Natesh, who is threatened with stalking by the hero, comes back at him with her girl gang and warns him in a supposed comedy scene. In a film that feels like you are sitting in an auditorium full of howlers shouting in unison for more than two hours, Anu Emmanuel is the only one who gets to pause and speak mildly. 

Liberally littering the screenplay with film references is passed off as comedy. "I write my own lines", "My revenge drama is coming soon" and suchlike are thrown around without a comical effect. One comedian after another keeps getting slapped around, insulted, or derided. Words like 'Africa' are shamelessly deployed to produce racist 'jokes'. When a female spirit possesses a male character, Saptagiri wonders if he is a transgender person (What!). 

If you are pining for a comedy this season, you better watch some old-fashioned fun entertainers on the Internet. It's most likely that your pick is far better than this relentlessly jarring 'Alludu Adhurs'.