Zara accused of cultural appropriation AGAIN

It was only last month that Zara was called out for a tie front checkered skirt which looked similar to a lungi, a traditional South Asian garment worn on a day to day basis.
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High Street fashion brand Zara has caught themselves in another major controversy and one that they are quite familiar with owing to their past experiences. The brand has been accused of directly stealing the traditional “baati style” from Somali and calling it ‘Tie-Dye Maxi Dress’. The backlash started out when Muslim Miss Universe contestant, Muna Juma - the contestant who made history by refusing to wear a bikini, took to Instagram to share her disappointment.

 

Muna Juma’s biggest issue with the brand was not for uplifting the style but majorly for not mentioning about where it roots from. Her Instagram post reads, “@zara is trying to capitalize on our Somali traditional wear sheed/baati  where’s the credit? For £39.99 you can get one for you, your Mama, & your Nana. Put some respect on it @zara.” Commenters have echoed her sentiments, writing, “Oh noo they didn't ” and “Are they kidding themselves .” One even chimed in, saying, “They’re basically running out of ideas .”

(Image Courtesy: Instagram)

The brand hasn’t given any sort of a statement or clarification over the issue. The dress is still pretty much available on the website and is up for sale. The brand has somehow always caught themselves amidst cultural appropriation controversies. It was only last month that they were called out for a tie front checkered skirt which looked similar to a lungi, a traditional South Asian garment worn on a day to day basis.

 

It is now high time that the Spanish brand starts taking their position seriously and avoid from making such blunders. What do you guys think? Comment and let us know.

Comments

The model looks mal nutritioned. Give her some food

Nothing beats their version of lungi :p

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