2 Yoga asanas and 2 mudras for breastfeeding mothers to stay calm, strong and agile

Breastfeeding mothers need to take care of their own mental and physical health. Hence, Grand Master Akshar helps them to stay calm and healthy with these 4 yoga asanas and mudras.
Yoga Asanas For Breastfeeding Mothers 2 Yoga asanas and 2 mudras for breastfeeding mothers to stay calm, strong and agile
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New mothers have a lot on their plate and this experience can make them feel overwhelming. While motherhood is beautiful, it can also be very challenging and demanding. To handle it with ease, new mothers who are breastfeeding can turn to the holistic science of yoga for solace. Following the mudras and asanas, shown by Grand Master Akshar, can steer you towards the cultivation of an improved state of mind and overall health.

Asanas

Baddha Konasana

1- Begin in Dandasana.

2- From stretched legs, fold them joining the soles of your feet together.

3- Bring your heels close to your pelvis.

4- Gently push your knees down.

5- With an exhalation, empty your stomach of air and lean forward with your upper body.

6- You can try to place your forehead on the floor.

Hindolasana

1- Begin sitting with your legs in Sukhasana.

2- Reach down, grab the outside of your right foot and bring it into the hollow of the left elbow.

3- Wrap your right arm around the outside of your right knee.

4- Cradling your leg and rocking it side to side, create a stretch in your right hip and IT band, along the side of your leg.

5- As you inhale, grow long through your spine and roll your shoulders back. Take 8-10 breaths then switch sides.

Mudras

Mudra is a sacred hand gesture or "seal," used for channelling prana which is the flow of vital life force energy.

Hakini mudra

Hakini mudra is also called the mudra for the mind. Named after the Hindu Goddess Hakini, Hakini in Sanskrit means "power" or "rule,".

It can be practiced in any stable seated posture such as sukhasana (easy pose) or padmasana (lotus pose), in which the spine can remain upright.

To practice this gesture, first bring the palms to face one another a few inches apart. Bring the fingertips and thumbs of both hands together, allowing them to maintain light contact. The hands can then be raised to the level of the third-eye chakra, in the centre of the forehead.

Breathe through the nostrils, and place the tongue against the roof of the mouth with each inhalation and relaxed with each exhalation.

Enhance the benefits of this mudra by focussing the drishti (gaze) towards the third-eye.

Hakini mudra can be practiced for up to 30 minutes daily, either in one go or broken down into three 10-minute practices.

Suchi mudra

Suchi mudra is believed to have healing properties. The term is derived from the Sanskrit word suchi, meaning “needle.” Practice Suchi mudra to relieve a range of blocking ailments and emotions, ease digestive problems, stress, etc.

It can be practiced in any stable seated posture such as sukhasana (easy pose) or padmasana (lotus pose), in which the spine can remain upright.

To perform this mudra, the thumb forms a fist with the middle, ring and little fingers and the forefinger extends upward similar to a "Number One" gesture.

This mudra should be practiced for six breaths four times per day with the focus on the navel and pelvic chakras (energy centres).
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