High & Low Density Lipoprotein: Check out the difference & how to maintain a healthy balance between both?

Updated on Oct 15, 2019 10:10 PM IST  |  1M
   
High & Low Density Lipoprotein: Check out the difference & how to maintain a healthy balance between both?
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Since cholesterol levels vary with age, gender and weight, doctors recommend that adults get their cholesterol levels checked every four to six years. In a standard test, cholesterol measured in three levels, i.e. total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein or ‘bad cholesterol’ and high density lipoprotein or ‘good cholesterol’. Most of us struggle in balancing these levels. While total and LDL cholesterol levels should be kept low, having more HDL cholesterol can offer some protection against heart-related illnesses including heart attacks and strokes. Total cholesterol level should be less than 200 mg/dL, LDL cholesterol levels should be less than 100 mg/dL, and the optimum HDL level should be 60 mg/dL or higher.

High density lipoprotein, or HDL, is the good cholesterol. HDL carries bad cholesterol back to the liver and cleanses cholesterol from the bloodstream. Low density lipoprotein, or LDL cholesterol, is the bad cholesterol. High level of LDL cholesterol puts you at a risk of heart diseases. Excess of LDL cholesterol can build up and stick to the walls of your arteries, which makes the arteries hard and narrow. This leads to the formation of a blood clot which can suddenly block an artery, leading to a heart attack or a stroke.

Adults with high cholesterol need to change to a better lifestyle as soon as they can. Since cholesterol levels build over time, a sudden change in lifestyle is the best option to maintain a healthy cholesterol level. It is of utmost importance for adults to stay active and maintain regular exercise routines. Women going through menopause and adults with high levels of cholesterol are suggested medication along with a diet and exercise routine. HDL cholesterol levels can be increased by getting regular aerobic exercise. LDL cholesterol levels can be lowered by eating foods low in saturated fat, cholesterol and trans fat. Be sure to include foods such as fish, oats, pectin and psyllium (found in berries, apples) in your diet. And most importantly, faithfully take the medicines that your doctor has prescribed!

 
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