Vitamin D and Diabetes: Here's why you should increase the intake of this nutrient

Diabetes is one of the common illness and around 400 million people across the world are suffering from the same and sadly, the number is only rising. Read on to know more.
People,diabetes,Vitamin DVitamin D and Diabetes: Here's why you should increase the intake of this nutrient
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Diabetes is one of the common illness and around 400 million people across the world are suffering from the same and sadly, the number is only rising. Talking about diabetes especially the common Type 2 one, the same is a body condition and in it, one faces a tough time to manage sugar levels. Mostly, people past the age of 40 develop the disease, but one can develop it earlier as well. Unfortunately, type 2 diabetes, lasts for the rest of the life and if not managed it can lead to more health complications.

But you don't have to worry much, as several remedies are available including a lot of medications and one of the ways to combat the disease is with the help of Vitamin D as the same helps to regulate insulin levels. 

For the unversed, this fat-soluble vitamin is found in certain foods and it is produced by the body when it gets exposed to the sun. When the sun's UVB rays are exposed to our skin, our body converts a type of cholesterol into Vitamin D. But unfortunately, many of us suffer from a deficiency in Vitamin D and Type 2 diabetes sufferers are also among them. Apart from aiding in curing diabetes, it also helps in maintaining the health of bones, teeth, joints and immune system among others.

Insulin is the hormone which is responsible for regulating blood sugar levels and this nutrient helps to reduce the risk of insulin resistance. Ideally, Vitamin D levels should be around 20-56 ng/ml. Also, many studies including a one which was published in the journal called PLOS ONE had revealed that Vitamin D deficiency can actually put people at the risk of developing diabetes (Type 2).

One of the studies has also shown how insulin-producing cells in the pancreas have this vitamin's receptors. Also, the byproducts of Vitamin D boost the production of insulin. Professor Cedric F. Garland said, "There was a strong relationship between vitamin D being low and a higher incidence of diabetes." He added, "Further research is needed on whether high 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels might prevent type 2 diabetes or the transition from pre-diabetes to diabetes. People who were low in vitamin D—below 30 ng/ml—were at five times the risk of developing diabetes as people who were at a healthier vitamin D level—50 ng/ml—over a period of 12 years."

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