Someone tried using Apple's AirTags to locate their check-in baggage at the airport. Failed. What went wrong?

Launched recently, Apple's AirTags seemed like a handy accessory to have. Apple seels the AirTags as a bundle of 4 at RS 10,900/- and a single unit at RS 3190/-
Apple, AirTags, Tracking, New release, Someone tried using Apple's AirTags to locate their check-in baggage at the airport. Failed. What went wrong?
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When Apple launched the AirTags last week, everyone was excited. Products within Apple's Eco-system communicate and work together in harmony. The integration is seamless, and it is rare to find third party products working well with your iPhone. With the new AirTags, consumers saw countless ways to use them. Track your keys, bags, children, pets, etc. We already have someone trying to track their check-in baggage using the AirTags.

No, it did not work. Not as expected to say the least. The user was expecting to see real-time tracking of the AirTag as it went through multiple conveyor belts. One needs to understand that Apple designed the Airtags to work as trackers for a whole year on a single battery. The tracking will work flawlessly when the AirTag is stationary or moving at a relatively slow speed.

Yes, there will be more functional/practical updates that the AirTags will receive in the months to come. Currently, a single AirTags is powered by a single CR2032. Apple claims that the battery should last a year before needing a replacement. Many of us are glad that Apple decided to go ahead with a user-replaceable battery over a non-replaceable one. SO after the battery runs out, we can replace the battery and not the AirTag.

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