FCUK Movie Review: Supposed coming-of-age comedy induces pounding headache

Just as the title FCUK is convoluted, the film is equally tangled. Writer-director Vidyasagar Raju force-fits random lines that make dull references to the story of the Ramayana, for example.
FCUK Movie Review: Supposed coming-of-age comedy induces pounding headache
  • 0
  • facebook
  • twitter
  • Share on whatsapp

Movie Name: FCUK

Cast: Ram Karthik, Ammu Abirami, Jagapathi Babu, and others 

Director: Vidyasagar Raju 

Rating: 1.5/5

FCUK, which is a short Father-Chitti-Umaa-Kaarthik, has got an unorthodox idea at its core. What happens when a 60-year-old man enters into a relationship with a woman and fathers a child, leading to some idiosyncratic outcomes? To be fair to the movie, an idea or two it projects in the form of dialogues are pertinent. Like how it's so wrong to be ageist. Like how sex workers are humans with a heart and a soul. The problem is, these relevant topics are buried under a heap of regressive ideas and juvenile comedy.

Kaarthik (Ram Karthik) and Umaa (Ammu Abirami) are cozying up to each other at a time when the latter is about to get married to Dasu (Bharath). When Chitti (Baby Saharshitha) enters Kaarthik's life as an infant sister, Umaa is unsettled but she eventually plays a positive role. But Kaarthik's father Fani Bhupal (Jagapathi Babu in the role of a sexagenarian philanderer) may turn out to be the unwanted eccentric guy in the piece. Will there be a resolution?

Just as the title FCUK is convoluted, the film is equally tangled. Writer-director Vidyasagar Raju force-fits random lines that make dull references to the story of the Ramayana, for example. There is also enough Internet gyaan (like what is number '6' for one is '9' for another when looked from a different angle) and quotes about sex and all. The middle-aged women live with the sole purpose of convincing Umaa that women have to dress properly so they don't kindle wrong thoughts in men. A dining table scene in the joint family has women agreeing that girls should be brought up in such a way that they value the quality of endurance. 

Umaa, who is a pediatrician, develops insecurities after her engagement. Out of this, she gets comically platonic with Kaarthik, who starts imposing himself on the poor woman - all in the name of romance. In a weird turn of events, she grudgingly agrees to date him. Any kiddo will know that, by the end of the last date, she will start having feelings for the hero. 

Sexism is so brazen in the movie that when a female infant cries, three male characters (all of whom are apparently adult) wonder why a girl is crying instead of making men cry. Had the film trained its focus on Jagapathi Babu's man-child ways and how reality hits him hard, FCUK would have been a watchable fare. But it harps on the romantic track, which is imbecilic. 

Except in the climax, Jagapathi's character comes undone. He is the owner of a condom-making company and every woman who bumps into him reacts to his double meaning lines with a dashing smile. When he does his basic human duty by bringing up his biological child, everyone praises his scintillating humanism. Bharath (remember the child artist Master Bharath?) comes across as a jester trapped into a child marriage. He just doesn't look like the suitor of a heroine.

If you want a sense of the level of 'jokes' this film revels in, here it is. A character says he is in 'London' when he means he is in the washroom. How many of you stopped laughing at this crap at the age of 10?